Tag Archives: healthcare

Patient Heal Thyself 

We’re within orb of the most powerful and life-changing triple conjunction of our lifetime. The last time it occurred was 2,300 years ago, marked by trade and knowledge advances – the by-products of Alexander the Great’s reign.  

This rare, empowering time invites us to think big. How would we like the future to look? Let’s wish greatly for practical ways to bring about positive change. 

Directing my thinking along this line, with the synchronicities my good angels use to get my attention, a marvelous site of remastered Manly P. Hall lectures popped magically into my YouTube feed.  

Over forty years ago, OA used Hall’s book on magic to instruct his small group on the way of the white magician: dedicating life to mastering the Laws of Nature in order to serve humanity.  

Now it has long been foreseen that the coming century will usher in a necessary rethinking of all the professions – healthcare, education, law, economics — you name it – across the board. 

Amongst those, heathcare is an immediate personal priority. So I looked to see what this newly discovered treasure has to offer on the subject. I wasn’t disappointed.

In The Healing Power of Universal Law, Hall compares the ancient vision of healing with modern medicine, hinting at changes to come. 

Ancient healers lived fully aligned with the quantum Life Wheel. They were profoundly connected with Source. They regarded themselves as priests. They related to patients with integrity and compassion; their attitude was one of humility and of service. By their very presence, these radiant beings quickened latent wholeness (health) within those who sought their help. 

Buddhist healers explained it this way. There are three distinct realms of existence. On the surface is the physical level of appearances (mass). Beneath it resides a subtle, unseen energetic level of radiance (Natural Law). Deeper still abides the level of light and universal law (Divine Law).  

According to Hall, the ancients made little distinction between Natural and Divine Law. They believed that physical illnesses are the consequence of living out of harmony with Nature and violating Divine Law. Patients were restored to physical health by realigning the inner levels of their lives. The healer’s job was to facilitate this process. 

To this end, the artists among them created images of healing. They found, for example, that meditating on the figure of a calm, serene deity offering blessings with one hand, holding a jar of universal healing elixir in the other, had beneficial results.  

Many healing sects, says Hall, both Buddhist and early Christian, “prescribed spiritual solutions to health problems, including the practices of meditation, contemplation and relaxation.” 

The healer’s end goal was not to perpetuate a dependent (and lucrative) relationship between physician and patient, but rather to instill in their patients the awareness that they have within themselves the inherent capacity to self-heal. Once awareness of innate, divine potentials was instilled, going forward, they became responsible to heal not only themselves, but others as well. 

This sacred ability is captured in the classic tarot deck. The Magician pictures the power of self-healing. The symbols of nature’s elements (earth, air, fire and water) are all available, spread out on the table. One hand reaches to heaven, the other points to earth. The infinity symbol over head represents the conscious ability to link, balance, and harmonize extremes.  

In contrast, today’s medical doctors have been trained in the narrow assumptions of empirical science. Too often, they’re motivated by status and financial reward. As Hall puts it, they’re “working merely from surfaces,” the same as any “real estate agent or second-hand car dealer.” 

They medicate. They dissect. But questions about emotional imbalance, spiritual disconnect, and their causative relationship to physical disease are outside the medical paradigm. At best, they’re relegated to psychotherapy or pastoral counseling.  

In the short-term, those seeking genuine healing are out of luck. If we prefer not to be medicated or surgically altered, seeing invasive approaches as adding more problems to the first one, where can we look for alternative, integrative approaches — ones which support a self-responsible approach to not just managing symptoms, but addressing root causes? 

Enter Dr. Zach Bush, a fascinating and influential pioneer in the field of medicine. As he evolves, he continues to lead the way towards a much-needed paradigm shift, returning to practices similar to ancient healing.  

To the point, I’ll quote sippets from a recent interview with Danicka Patrick.

Zach: I just closed my clinic, which was a really emotional process for me. Because I had it – my primary identity as a doctor – for almost thirty years. 

Danicka: Congratulations. 

Zach: Thank you. I did it because calling yourself a doctor . . . says, You know what? You all are sick. And I’m here to fix you. I realized I was part of the problem for my patients. My patients can’t actually completely heal because they believed I had their answer. I have to step out of that role to engage with my fellow humans in a bigger way so that they can heal and I can be witness to their healing.  

Danicka: Wow! A total paradigm shift! 

Zach:  We’re finally tapping into something that’s deeper than biology. We have a program we call Journey to Intrinsic Health. It lays out eight fundamental steps towards finding a lifestyle that supports the fundamental biology of human life. It’s very simple stuff. 

[These include relaxation, introspection, and meditation, similar to ancient healing methods.]  

But once presented in the system that allows you to understand your own capacity for biologic thrive-state, it frees you from the list of diagnosis and diseases that you had previously been defining yourself as. 

. . .  when people are drawn to you, it’s not actually for your physical form. Your physical form is the direct result of the tone that’s sung below you.   

. . .  I believe this is our next step of humanity. If we’re going to change our course, we are going to have to see past the 0.001% shell. 

In sum, I’m reminded of the Serenity Prayer: 

God grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change; 

 Courage to change the things I can; And wisdom to know the difference. 

The ancients admonished, “Physician heal thyself.” How could anyone quicken others to health who isn’t first whole within himself? It’s unrealistic to expect doctors not trained in the quantum paradigm to confer wholeness (health) on others.   

Yes, it’s unfortunate. But I choose to accept it and move on to what can be changed: ME. 

I choose not to be limited by the limitations others, in their ignorance, would impose upon me. I choose to take responsibility for my own self-healing, and eventually for the well-being of others – even, eventually, through the butterfly effect – for the healing of the planet itself. 

Granted, today’s healthcare industry is entrenched and inflexible. In the short term, there’s not much we can do to change that. But each of us, one at a time, can change ourselves, from the inside out. For my part, I choose to adapt the old motto: 

PATIENT, HEAL THYSELF. 

———–

Patricia West is author of The Common Sense Book of Change and Two Sides of a Coin: Lao Tze’s Common Sense Way of Change. She’s currently working on The Phoenix Response: Dying To Be Reborn – in the Same Lifetime.

Rethinking HOPE

hope

Paradoxically, the following Essay on Hope compliments the one on Death shared in The Phoenix Response. Tellingly, it reflects beliefs significantly different from those held by my grandparents, Ellie and Hubble West. It might explain, at least in part, their experience of old age.

Nor is the subject merely academic. As I currently face unanticipated health challenges, like many baby-boomers of my generation, I’m being challenged to face and rethink my personal survival expectations.

I’ll explain all this at length later. But for now, here are my earlier thoughts on Hope, for your thoughtful consideration.

Essay 63. HOPE

That the God of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Father of Glory, may give unto you wisdom the spirit of and revelation in the knowledge of him:

The eyes of your understanding being enlightened; that ye may know what is the hope of his calling, and what the riches of the glory of his inheritance in the saints,

And what is the exceeding greatness of his power to usward who believe, according to the working of his mighty power. . .

— St. Paul, Ephesians

Here the people could stand it no longer and complained of the long voyage; but the Admiral cheered them as best he could, holding out the good hope of the advantages they would have. He added that it was useless to complain, he had come [to go] to the Indies, and so had to continue it until he found them, with the help of Our Lord.  — Christopher Columbus, Journal of the First Voyage

We live at a particularly perilous moment, one in which self-deception is a subject of increasing urgency. The planet itself faces a threat unknown in other times: its utter destruction. . . The splitting of the atom, said Einstein, has changed everything, save how we think. And thus, he observed, “we drift toward unparalleled catastrophe.” — Daniel Goleman, Vital Lies, Simple Truths

We are seeing a health care system in pain, people in pain, and a world in pain. I believe that something can be done to make it better. — Patch Adams, Gesundheit!

THE FRONT

Webster’s defines hope as a feeling that what is wanted will happen. It’s a desire accompanied by expectation. It can mean that which one has a hope for. It can mean a reason for hope. A meaning listed as archaic is to trust or rely.

In I Ching context, hope transcends short-sighted wishing and emotional wanting. It is a trust that one has the wherewithal to respond appropriately to every change of fortune. It is not total self-sufficiency, but awareness that one’s efforts are met half way. When one does the best one can, the rest is supplied in the right way, at the right time.

Daniel Goleman emphasizes the direct relationship between honest self-awareness and survival. Like Einstein and like Strauss and Howe (authors of The Fourth Turning), Goleman is a messenger of awareness we’re often trained to block out.

His vision accords with The Book of Change philosophy in this: ignoring dangers, deceiving ourselves that all is well when it isn’t, doesn’t make problems go away. It only renders us powerless to recognize early warning signals in time to prepare and ameliorate the worst that might come.

In The Fourth Turning, Strauss and Howe emphasize that declining resources will necessitate major changes in healthcare delivery. Anticipating that the cost of health-care will continue to rise and become increasingly unaffordable, they recommend that cost-effective, affordable alternatives along the lines of Adams’ work be put in place now.

Forward-looking health practitioners are therefore now turning to inexpensive, preventive self-maintenance practices like Tai Chi, Qigong and yoga.

There are hidden benefits to timely austerities. Though it is unfortunate that people see fit to return back to self-responsible methods only as a last resort, if the prospect of hard times returns people back to their more simple and beneficial roots, it is a (however well disguised) blessing.

In his epistle to the Corinthians, St. Paul wrote of hope in the context of faith and charity. His hope isn’t Webster’s hope of wanting and expecting. Like I Ching hope, it is trust that human events which make no sense in the short-term fit into the larger pattern of life, and that God’s will inevitably in the long-term prevails.

THE BACK

The opposite of hope is despair. Seeing one’s situation as hopeless is a self-fulfilling prophecy. So long as one places hope in externals, one feeds the illusion of powerlessness. Turning the focus of hope inwards makes all the difference.

Self-deception is a perversion of hope. Lacking a concept of cyclical change, linear thinkers hope to control time. They defy the aging process or pretend change can’t or hasn’t happened rather than adjusting and benefiting from new opportunities that arise to replace the ones which pass away.